It Don’t Mean a Thing if it Don’t Make that Ding

Apologies to Duke Ellington.

You might have heard a new sound on the main program stream… “click ding”. It’s a new feature, and it sounds at :59 minutes past the hour in the morning and during the day (New York Time). It should reach your ear somewhere between :00 and :01 (after buffering at the server and your receiving device).

Because the main stream is programmed as a “super station” for people who like to keep a buzz on, we know you may have issues with keeping track of time. I know I do sometimes. Maybe even more often than that. I can get lost in work, in space, or both. It’s OK, Radio InfoWeb is on it. During the morning and afternoon, there are plenty of time checks, and the “ding” should help too, especially during those long sets. When you hear it, look up and if your clock doesn’t indicate the top of the hour, then what you’re hearing has gotten out of sync with real time. If you care (it’s OK if you don’t), you can resync by stopping the stream (not pausing), and then starting. If you’re listening through a web browser, you might have to refresh the page, or perhaps even close out the tab or window, and come all the way back in. It’s just a matter of how your browser handles audio streaming.

What’s a “super station? Glad you asked. It’s a classification that developed during the golden days of terrestrial (that is, not Internet) radio. A “superstation” is a station that “does it all” – News, Music, Time, Weather, Features, Public Service, and whatever else listeners might find handy. As I mentioned above, Radio InfoWeb’s main stream is programmed as a super station for people who like to keep a buzz on.

If “super” isn’t so “super” for you, then try tuning into Radio InfoWeb World. That’s a stream with the same music programming as the main stream, only minus all the “super station” stuff. It’s a little less lively, and it’s not tuned to the time of day (in New York City). It does have (approximately) hourly newscasts though, albeit from a darker and more questionable source (the US Government). This feed was also designed as a convenient pick-up and filler-inner for pirate or other terrestrial radio stations. Cool, huh?

On the other hand, we put the max TLC into the “main stream” including every effort to keep the fidelity as high as possible (so we won’t kill your buzz by paining your ears that way). The new 128/192K Vorbis stream does just that. Sweetness for your ears.

Thanks for listening! If you’d like to contact us, all you have to do is listen. The info is given out regularly for those who care.

See you ’round the Galaxy!

– Rex

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